quackdamnit asked:

So are you still thinking about going to school for planning? If so, where?

Yes, I am looking at considering the CEP Program (Community, Environment, and Planning) at UW. I’m still figuring out what I’d like to focus on and whether it will be worth it. I’m currently volunteer-interning with Transportation Choices Coalition and exploring… here’s my urbanism tumblr :)

There was a silence gathered all about that fire and the silence was in the men’s faces, and time was there, time enough to sit by this rusting track under the trees, and look at the world and turn it over with the eyes, as if it were held to the center of the bonfire, a piece of steel these men were all shaping. It was not only the fire that was different. It was the silence. Montag moved toward this special silence that was concerned with all of the world.

And then the voices began and they were talking, and he could hear nothing of what the voices said, but the sound rose and fell quietly and the voices were turning the world over and looking at it; the voices knew the land and the trees and the city which lay down the track by the river. The voices talked of everything, there was nothing they could not talk about, he knew, from the very cadence and motion and continual stir of curiosity and wonder in them.
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
And wasn’t it this bright boy you selected for beatings and tortures after hours? Of course it was. We must all be alike. Not everyone born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal. Each man the image of every other; then all are happy, for there are no mountains to make them cower, to judge themselves against.
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
At least once in his career, every fireman gets an itch. What do the books say, he wonders. Oh to scratch that itch, eh? Well, Montag, take my word for it, I’ve had to read a few in my time, to know what I was about, and the books say nothing! Nothing you can teach or believe. They’re about nonexistent people, figments of imagination, if they’re fiction. And if they’re nonfiction, it’s worse, one professor calling another an idiot, one philosopher screaming down another’s gullet. All of them running about, putting out the stars and extinguishing the sun. You come away lost.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

the more one learns, the less one knows

brainpickings

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

So I got bored and decided to make this post. It’s been something I’ve been thinking about for awhile because I love a good origin story and there seems to be an “air” when talking about abortion, it seems like people seriously think abortion only started from around…

Rather than succumbing to our petty insecurities by blaming others for their economic conditions, we need to look at the macroeconomic factors that are hurting our labor markets. We need to recognize that automation and artificial intelligence are pushing us towards a new era of work– one with tremendous potential productivity gains, but also tremendous uncertainty for labor, even educated labor. It’s time to stop calling people chumps and start building the kind of social system that can guarantee basic material security for all of our people, so that we can all share in the staggering gains of efficiency and productivity that technology is bringing about.
bitterlemonn
And that visibility which makes us most vulnerable is that which also is the source of our greatest strength. Because the machine will try to grind you into dust anyway, whether or not we speak. We can sit in our corners mute forever while our sisters and our selves are wasted, while our children are distorted and destroyed, while our earth is poisoned; we can sit in our safe corners mute as bottles, and we will still be no less afraid.
Audre Lorde, “Transformation of Silence” in Sister Outsider (via knopperbrister)